The Overweight Dog Epidemic

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Do you have an overweight dog? This is a very sensitive topic for many dog moms and dads, and I can relate. Despite all of my intentions and wanting to do right by my dog, he still managed to gain a few unnecessary pounds. I was over-treating and overfeeding my dog without even realizing it. I’ve taken to measuring Dexter’s food and setting treats aside for the day so I don’t go overboard. In the past few months, my dog has managed to lose a few unnecessary pounds. I am grateful for this because:

A) it means he is healthier in the long run

B) he just had cruciate ligament surgery and extra weight is not good for the long road to recovery and rehab

It is estimated that 55 percent of dogs and cats in the United States are overweight. We’re posting a fun and informative chart of info below that lists general caloric intake requirements and healthy eating tips. Always double check with your vet or a veterinary nutritionist for true caloric requirements, as every dog’s metabolism and bodily needs are different.

How can you tell if a dog is overweight?

Feel around his ribs and spine; you should be able to locate both, with only a thin layer f fat separating skin from bones. If you are unable to find the ribcage, you have an overweight dog.  Viewing the dog from above, you should be able to see a moderate narrowing at the waist just past the ribcage. A large and drooping abdomen is another sign that your pet is overweight.  A bulging line from the ribcage to the hips indicates an overweight dog. Ask your veterinarian to evaluate your dog’s size at every check-up.   Once your canine has reached maturity, ask for his optimal weight.

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